Part 1:

Conduct a Comprehensive Needs Assessment (Timeline: March-May 2017)

  • Step 1: Identify your School Improvement Team (SIT)

    • School staff and parent representatives shall constitute a school improvement team and the team shall be elected by their respective groups by secret ballot.

    • Parents shall be elected by parents of children enrolled in the school in an election by either the parent/teacher organization or the largest organization of parents formed specifically for the election.

    • Parents, serving on school improvement teams shall reflect the racial and socioeconomic composition of the students enrolled in the school and shall NOT be members of the building-level staff.

    • Team meetings shall be held at convenient times to assure substantial parent participation.

    • All school improvement plans shall be data-driven.

    • Shall include a duty-free lunch period for every teacher.

    • The principal shall submit plan to the local board of education only if the proposed school improvement plan has the approval of a majority of the staff who voted on the plan.


School Improvement Team Member (s)

Role(s)

Tori Inscoe

Teacher

Abby Gonzalez

Teacher

Stephanie Patton

Teacher

Wanda Keith

Assistant Principal

Mahalia Bullock

Teacher

Michael Pentoney

Teacher

Cynthia Cotton

Teacher

Shannon Dixon

Teacher


Natasha Von Klingler

Instructional Coach

Michelle Robinson

Media Specialist

Mrs. Stepnowski

Parent

Trenace Gilmore

Principal

  • Step 2: Understand and Assign Tasks

    • A wealth of data sources are gathered

    • Open, honest, and non-biased collaboration occurs

  • Step 3: Collect and Organize Data

Ensure all understand the purpose and desired outcomes of the process

What do we want to accomplish? How do we facilitate the process? What are the time constraints? Identify roles and responsibilities for each team member that ensures


Establish a plan for gathering and processing data

Data Sources

  • Student Achievement Data -

  • Curriculum and Instruction

  • Professional Development

  • Technology -

  • Family/Community Involvement

Collection of Data

  • Establish a detailed plan or roadmap

  • What data is missing? What are the essential questions to ask to ensure data reflects the entire school?

  • How should the data be organized?

  • Collection of Valid and Reliable Data (e.g. surveys, focus groups)


  • Early Childhood Assessment Data

  • Teacher Quality -

  • School (e.g., culture, climate, organization)

  • Perceptions*

  • Longitudinal data is also an important consideration (examination of progress over time, patterns and trends)

  • Use of consistent worded survey items

  • Develop scripts for focus groups that are followed carefully

  • Use trained interviewers to reduce biases in data collection

  • Step 4: Analyze the Data

Based on the 3yr trend, our data shows Louisburg Elementary has been a school of high growth but low proficiency. In the years of 13-14 and 14-15, we exceeded and met growth but our school performance grade was a D. Our focus as a school was to intervene on the behalf of the low level students with very little focus on the middle and high groups. As a result, in the year of 13-14, our reading and math scores remained in the high 30% and low 40%. All subgroups except for our Multi race, White and AIG subgroups, scored below 50%. The subgroups listed above only represented a small portion of our school population. The subgroups that represented majority of our student enrollment, Black, Hispanic, and the economically disadvantaged struggled to meet proficiency higher than 38%. In the year of 14-15, the subgroups that represented majority of our student population showed growth in proficiency but the other subgroups Multi race, White and AIG declined in proficiency.

As you look at our school, student enrollment, class size, and attendance, have all remained consistent over the past three years; however, discipline has seen a significant change. In the year of

13-14 our rate of short term suspensions per 100 students was 11.22. Along with this data our school attendance also dropped from more than 96% to 95.3%. We know our students must be present in school in order for us to increase their proficiency. This same year we were also a low performing school. The following year 14-15 we decreased the short term suspensions to 3.15 per 100 students. We believed this played a role in our school increasing our school performance grade from 42 to 44 although we were still labeled a low performing school.

Currently our school is focusing on improving all students with a focus on our students in the middle group. Our current data shows we are still a school with high growth and now with increased proficiency in all areas.

Strengths Based Upon Data:

Areas of Concern Based Upon Data:

High Growth / Exceeding Growth

Reading K - 5

Teacher Flexibility

Professional Development-differentiated small group instruction and data analysis for math and reading

Efficient/Flexible Scheduling

Parent Involvement


image

Math K - 5


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Part 2: Complete the School Improvement Plan (May-August 2018)

Each school should have 3-4 goals, each aligned to the strategic plan. These goals should be SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and time-bound). These goals should be based upon a comprehensive needs assessment by the School Improvement Team.

School Vision: We, the teachers and staff of Louisburg Elementary, are committed to being “ALL IN”. We believe we will be successful because we believe in ourselves and our students!


School Mission: The faculty and staff of Louisburg Elementary School have made a commitment to: Accept All, Teach All, Challenge All, and Improve All Children


FCS

Bluepri nt Goal:

FCS

Blueprint Objective (s)

Specific

School Goal(s) (Must be measurable):

Strategies/Ac tion Steps to Meet Goal:

Resources/Fundi ng

Allocated (include funding source)

Person(s) responsible for monitoring/ reporting

Timeline for Monitoring/ Reporting

Artifacts/Evidences of Successful Completion

3

1

By June 2017, 62%

and by 2018

64% of our

1. Bi-Weekly & Quarterly PLC - K-5

  1. Data notebook (digital-hard copy)

  2. Teacher

K-5 Grade Chairs Leadership Instructional Coach

  1. Weekly & Quarterly Agenda

  2. Every 4-6 weeks report data

Parent Night Agendas; PLC Meeting agenda; K-5 Lesson Plans; Student data sheets


students will

2.Instructional

provided lesson

3-4. Weekly teacher

K-5 Teacher student

be proficient

Assistants K-5

plans; Train

lesson plans

achievement data

in reading as

3. Encore held

instructional

5. Quarterly Sign-in

Instructional Asst. lesson

measured by

daily

assistants to use

sheet

plans

the state

(Enriching the

instructional

Case 21 data

assessments.

Core-interven

strategies

K-3 3d Wireless (TRC

tion &

3. Instructional

data)

enrichment)

Assistants;

Professional development

4. Quarterly

Teacher provided

certificates

Parent

resources

PRIDE meeting

Involvement

4. Parent

presentations

Meetings

Involvement

5.Professional

Committee; Title

development

1 Funds

K-5 teachers

5. K-5 teachers

and

and instructional

Instructional

assistants, Title 1

asst.

funds

(focus-differe

6. Wilson’s

ntiated and

FUNDations

small group

program

Instruction for

7. Master

reading)

schedule

6. Daily K-2

8. Title 1 funds

Phonics

Instruction


with Wilson’s FUNDamental

  1. Equitable schedule

  2. Achieve 3000 Encore Lab grades 3-5

  3. School wide reading strategies for vertical alignment

2

1

By June 2017, 62%

and by 2018

65% of our students will be proficient in math as measured by the state assessments.

  1. Bi-Weekly & Quarterly PLC - K-5

  2. In school math tutor 3-5

3.Instructional Assistants K-5

  1. Encore Daily

  2. Quarterly Parent

  1. Data notebook (digital-hard copy)

  2. Title 1 Funding

  3. Teacher provided lesson plans; Train instructional assistants to use instructional strategies

  4. Instructional

K-5 Grade Chairs Leadership Instructional Coach

  1. Weekly & Quarterly Agenda

  2. Every 4-6 weeks report data

3-4. Weekly teacher lesson plans

5. Quarterly Sign-in sheet

Parent Night Agendas; PLC Meeting agenda; K-5 Lesson Plans; Student data sheets

K-5 Teacher student achievement data Instructional Asst. lesson plans

Case 21 data

Professional development certificates

PRIDE meeting presentations


Involvement Meetings 6.Professional development K-5 teachers and Instructional asst.

(focus-differe ntiated and small group Instruction for math)

7. Math Talk K-5 daily

Assistants; Teacher provided resources

  1. Parent Involvement Committee; Title 1 Funding

  2. K-5 teachers and instructional assistants, Title 1 funds

  3. Title 1 funds

1

1

By June 2017, 70%

and by 2018

77% of our students will be proficient in Science as measured by the state assessments.

1. Weekly & Quarterly PLC 5th 2.Instructional Assistants K-5

3. Quarterly Parent Involvement Meetings

  1. Data notebook (digital-hard copy)

  2. Teacher provided lesson plans; Train instructional assistants to use instructional strategies

K-5 Grade Chairs Leadership Instructional Coach

  1. Weekly & Quarterly Agenda

  2. Every 4-6 weeks report data

3-4. Weekly teacher lesson plans

5. Quarterly Sign-in sheet

Parent Night Agendas; PLC Meeting agenda; K-5 Lesson Plans; Student data sheets

K-5 Teacher student achievement data Instructional Asst. lesson plans

Case 21 data


4. K-5 Daily Science lessons

3. Parent Involvement Committee; Title 1 Funding

4

1

By June 2017, 60% of 4th grade students will demonstrate level 3 or higher proficiency on Technology skills checklist.

1. A rubric created for K-5 technology skills

1. Instructional Coach

2-3. Desktops

/Chromebooks Computer labs Smartboards

2-3. K-5 Grade Chairs and Leadership (Title 1 funding)

Classroom Teacher Instructional Coach Tech Support

Weekly lesson plans Quarterly projects

Technology teacher’s lesson plans

Project Rubrics Students produced tech projects

Friday Institute Technology Skills Checklist grade 3-5

FCS technology rubric for K-2 (being developed)


Statement of Assurances/SIP Team Signatures:


The School Improvement Team has a plan in place to provide duty-free lunch to our teachers. Principal Signature: Trenace Gilmore Date: 9/8/17

The school staff has voted on the proposed School Improvement Plan, and the majority of staff agree with the plan. Principal Signature: Trenace Gilmore Date: 9/8/17


I was actively involved in the School Improvement Process at our school. Signatures of School Improvement Team Members:


Part 3: Review the School Improvement Plan Prior to Submission (August 2016)

When the plan is submitted to the district level for review, the “FCS School Improvement Plan Rubric” will be used as the criteria by which this will be evaluated. Please take time to review your plan in relation to the rubric to ensure that the plan is completed at a high level.


Part 4: Submit the Plan to the District for Review (August 31, 2016)

Please forward the electronic version of the plan to Dr. Schuhler via email by August 31, 2016)

Please forward a hard copy of the plan, with statement of assurances (duty-free lunch, attestation of staff vote) and signatures of SIP team members, along with a hard copy of the plan, to Dr. Schuhler’s office by August 31st.


Part 5: District Plan Review (by September 30, 2016)

Plan will be reviewed at the district level utilizing the “FCS School Improvement Plan Rubric.” Feedback will be given and appropriate adjustments made.


Part 6: Plan Presented to Board (at October 2016 FCS Board Meeting)